Define the law, explain what it means, provide details about when it was created, why it was created, which federal agency or department regulates its compliance, and what its implications are to Union-Management Relations.

Research the “Age Discrimination in Employment Act”. Define the law, explain what it means, provide details about when it was created, why it was created, which federal agency or department regulates its compliance, and what its implications are to Union-Management Relations.

Are there any circumstances in which it is reasonable to blame people for getting sick and to therefore judge them to be undeserving of health care financed by others?

1000 – 1500 word argumentative essay
Are there any circumstances in which it is reasonable to blame people for getting sick and to therefore judge them to be undeserving of health care financed by others?

Give an accurate analysis of the arguments presented and to give well-constructed arguments. Lastly, give an accurate account of the theories and terms presented in the reading.

The discipline is Drugs, society and human behavior.
Give an accurate analysis of the arguments presented and to give well-constructed arguments. Lastly, give an accurate account of the theories and terms presented in the reading.

What question would you investigate during a Learning Cluster? Describe why this topic is one you are passionate about and how you envision solving or supporting this particular issue.

During January block, Soka students participate in a Learning Cluster or research seminar where students work in teams with faculty to propose, research, and model constructive approaches to local, regional and/or global issues.

What question would you investigate during a Learning Cluster? Describe why this topic is one you are passionate about and how you envision solving or supporting this particular issue.

Describe what the results would look like if the data supports your hypothesis.Describe what the results would look like if your data does not support your hypothesis.

pro and cons of paying college athletes

For this activity you will:

State your research topic and purpose.

State your research question(s).

List and label the variables as independent, dependent, intervening, or moderating.
State your hypothesis.

Describe the limitations present in your study. Be thorough.

Describe what the results would look like if the data supports your hypothesis.

Describe what the results would look like if your data does not support your hypothesis.

If the data supports your hypothesis, explain what conclusions would you draw and what recommendations would you make.

Discuss the theory’s relevance to service learning as a method of instruction for agriculture and extension education.

Critical reflection paper on Dewey’s Experimental and social learning.
Presentation and summary of the theory/concept;

A discussion of the theory/concept regarding the views of our scholars ( pro and con), which can be found in the course readings and and other literature found by conducting a library database search. Points should be organized and meaningful.
Discuss the theory’s relevance to service learning as a method of instruction for agriculture and extension education.
Papers graded in terms of proper use of APA and writing style. And adequacy of the response.

What is the association between smoking recreational marijuana and the occurrence of lung cancer in in seniors aged 55 and older?

The role marijuana smoking plays in the occurrence of lung cancer

Epidemiological study design: case control study
2. Main exposure/risk factor(s): marijuana
3. Health outcome/disease(s): lung cancer
4. Population of interest : senior population (individuals 55 and older)
5. Research question(s): What is the association between smoking recreational marijuana and the occurrence of lung cancer in in seniors aged 55 and older?

• Background (one page maximum)
• Statistics and information about the health outcome/disease(s)
• Statistics and information about the exposure/risk factor(s)
• Brief discussion of possible connection between exposure(s) and outcome(s) and justification for the study

• Target population and sample size
• Description of target population and sample
o Inclusion and exclusion criteria
o The sampling strategy to be used
• Sample size considerations (how large of a sample cancer do you need and why)

• Recruitment (primary data collection) or data selection (secondary data) strategies
• If collecting your own data, describe:
o How you will find and contact potential participants (where, when, with what method)
o The type of data collection method to be used (e.g., online survey)
o How many times participants will be contacted and by what method
• If using secondary data (an existing database), describe:
o The procedures used for recruitment, participation, and data collection by the owners of the database (i.e., how were the data in the database collected?)
o How you will gain access to the dataset

• Selection biases
• Description of potential selection bias concerns (i.e., how representative your sample will be of the larger population)
• Discussion of strategies you will use to minimize selection bias in your study

Write a 1000-word essay on how society’s response to the AIDS pandemic reflected in the mainstream culture of the 90s, citing some artworks in this unit.

PART 4 _PROMPT_Instructions-Disease and Culture, Final Project

Write a 1000-word essay on how society’s response to the AIDS pandemic reflected in the mainstream culture of the 90s, citing some artworks in this unit.

Identify and explain why you chose the specific community you will be reaching. How will you integrate the impact of your experience abroad into your project? With which campus departments, student organizations, or community organizations will you collaborate?

Building Mutual Understanding Essay and Follow-on Service Project Proposal Essay

COMMUNITY IMPACT ESSAYS
The two community impact essays are equally important in the selection of Gilman Scholarship recipients. We strongly encourage you to read the Selection Criterion Community Impact Abroad & Student’s Return Home, carefully review your essay, and ask an advisor, faculty member, or others to proofread your essay for spelling, grammar, and content prior to submission.

1. Building Mutual Understanding Essay

Gilman Scholars represent the United States as citizen diplomats in their host communities; they reflect a diversity of values, beliefs, and opinions that is fundamental to providing a balanced representation of the United States abroad.

Gilman Scholars are expected to contribute to the goal of building mutual understanding by sharing what it means to be an American, learning about the host culture, and building meaningful relationships. (max of 3000 characters)

As a U.S. citizen, how will you represent and share what it means to be an American during your program?

How will you seek opportunities to become more culturally engaged and have meaningful interactions with people and cultures different from your own during your abroad program?

2. Follow-on Service Project Proposal

Gilman Scholars are expected to complete the Follow-on Service Project which is to increase awareness of study abroad and the Gilman Scholarship among their peers in their home or campus communities. (max of 3000 characters)

In no particular order, describe your Follow-on Service Project in more detail: What is your project and how will it increase awareness of study abroad and the Gilman Program among your peers in your home or campus community?

Identify and explain why you chose the specific community you will be reaching. How will you integrate the impact of your experience abroad into your project? With which campus departments, student organizations, or community organizations will you collaborate?

See our Frequently Asked Questions for additional information on your Follow-on Service Project Proposal. Upon completion of your Follow-on Service Project, you will be required to submit a final report summarizing and assessing its impact.

Examples of Follow-on Service Projects

Gilman Scholars have proposed and carried out a wide range of Follow-on Service Projects. As long as the applicant’s proposal will meet the goals of the Follow-on Service Project, there are no right or wrong projects. However, we encourage

all applicants to propose a unique Follow-on Service Project that highlights their individual background, experiences, talents and skills. Listed below are some examples of projects Gilman Scholars have carried out. This is by no means an

Exhaustive list and we look forward to continuing to receive unique, individual proposals from all applicants. Remember, all projects must promote international education and the Gilman Scholarship.

K-12 OUTREACH
Conducting presentations on their country of study to local classrooms.

Working with a local teacher to connect with a U.S. classroom while abroad, via photos, letters, emails or Skype sessions, sharing information about their host country, experience abroad and the Gilman Scholarship.

Organizing and/or working with their university K-12 outreach program, to present and share information on their

experience abroad and the Gilman Scholarship.

Participating in their local high school College Night to share information on study abroad opportunities and scholarships.

Working with/giving presentations on study abroad and the Gilman Scholarship to high school language or area studies classes.

Working with/giving presentations on study abroad and the Gilman Scholarship to programs that mentor high school students, such as Upward Bound.
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT OUTREACH:

Development of a study abroad information page for the department or major website that lists a suggested academic timeline encouraging students to incorporate study abroad into their degree, in consultation with their department and study abroad office.

Organizing information on study abroad programs that offer coursework and academic credit in their field of study and links to Gilman and other scholarships and financial aid information that support these opportunities.

Presentations on study abroad and the Gilman Scholarship at academic club or honor society meetings.

Development of a brochure or informational flyer specific to the student’s academic department or field of study that is then posted in the study abroad office.

Serving as a mentor/peer advisor to potential study abroad students in their field of study.

Submitting an article to their academic department newsletter on their experiences abroad and the Gilman Scholarship either while the student is still overseas or upon their return.

CAMPUS OFFICE OUTREACH:

Students often propose to work with a specific on-campus office including the Diversity/Minority Services offices,

Disability Services offices, Career Centers, Financial Aid offices, Student Leadership offices, and other campus offices. Examples of these projects include:

Promoting and encouraging study abroad opportunities and the Gilman Scholarship through presentations to student clubs and organizations and through office organized events

Posting information on the Gilman Scholarship Program in specific campus offices

Adding a web page to the official website that highlights study abroad opportunities, the Gilman Scholarship, and information that would be of help/interest to students

Serving as an official representative at campus fairs and events by sharing information on study abroad and the Gilman Scholarship

STUDY ABROAD OUTREACH:

This is the most common type of Follow-on Service Project students propose and can be very beneficial to increase study abroad participation at your home institution.

Consider consulting with the study abroad office to address any challenges or needs your home institution faces in order to offer support through your project and positively impact your campus and peers.

Volunteering or working in the study abroad office as a Peer Mentor/Advisor to potential study abroad students, sharing information about the Gilman Scholarship.

Representing the study abroad office and Gilman Scholarship at presentations/information sessions on study abroad.

Ensuring the study abroad office website has a Scholarship Information page and that a link to the Gilman Scholarship Program’s website is provided.

Submitting an article on their experiences abroad and Gilman Scholarship to the Study Abroad office newsletter for distribution or publication, either while they are still abroad or upon their return.

Developing an informational flyer/brochure on university-specific financial aid procedures for study abroad and available scholarships, including the Gilman Scholarship which is then housed in the study abroad office.

Participating in/organizing a Study Abroad Alumni society which assists returned and potential study abroad students, sharing information about the Gilman Scholarship.

Serving as a resource person for a specific country/program/field of study that would advise/assist potential study abroad students, sharing information about the Gilman Scholarship.

OTHER OUTREACH:

Submitting a weekly or monthly article on their experiences overseas to their campus or hometown newspaper while the students are abroad, thereby sharing information with a wide range of readers and including information on the Gilman Scholarship

Submitting an article or series of articles on their experiences abroad and the Gilman Scholarship to their campus or hometown paper upon their return to the U.S.

Working with another local organization to share information on study abroad and the country they studied in with their members

Presenting on study abroad opportunities and the Gilman Scholarship Program at Freshman Orientation or in First-Year

Experiences courses thereby encouraging students to consider study abroad earlier rather than later.

Hosting a photography exhibit on their campus or in their community, sharing about their experience abroad, international opportunities that exist and the Gilman Scholarship

Presenting art created in or focused on their host country on their campus or in their community, including information on international education and the Gilman Scholarship.

COMMUNITY IMPACT ABROAD AND UPON STUDENT’S RETURN HOME

The mission of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs is to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries by means of educational and cultural exchange.

The Gilman Program plays an essential role in achieving this mission, because study abroad is a form of diplomacy. Gilman Scholars represent the United States as citizen diplomats in their host communities; they reflect a diversity of values, beliefs, and opinions that is fundamental to providing a balanced representation of the United States abroad.

A successful Gilman applicant will articulate how they anticipate contributing to the goal of building mutual understanding by sharing what it means to be an American, learning about the host culture, and building meaningful relationships.

Upon return to the United States, Gilman Scholars have the opportunity to inspire the next wave of students to study or intern abroad through the required Follow-on Service Project.

The goal of the Follow-on Service Project is for Gilman Scholars to increase awareness of study abroad and the Gilman Program among their peers in their home communities and campuses.

A successful Gilman applicant will design a Follow-on Service Project proposal that is feasible, utilizes one’s experience abroad, and connects to diverse groups of Americans.

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